squeezing Into The Mould

Fitting into this crazy world, regardless of ability is a hard task. For women, wearing the right clothes, shoes, make-up and hair styles along with being into the “right things” is an added pressure. But add to that equation being blind and a young lady? Wow, now you’re talking difficult.

 

I’m 27 now and have been totally blind since being 6 and a half years old. I attended a mainstream high school and did youth theatre in my teenage years, then did performing arts and attended a local sixth form college at 16. After which I went to university and was somewhat of a social butterfly. I felt the pressures of looking “trendy” and being “trendy”.

 

An example of this was my first year at university when I was cohersed into buying my first pair of hair straighteners. I’d never really bothered too much about my long mane of hair besides having highlights and such previously but it was a situation after a few friends suggested it to me I felt the need to comply and give into the new trend of having immaculately straight hair.

 

this is all fine and good and personally, I’ve been lucky enough to have a great mum, auntie, friends and cousins who’ve helped me shape my own style. I’m no fashion guru, and only jump on fashions when I actually like them. But who is to say what I should have been wearing during my youth and now?

 

Reading a blog a few minutes ago from one of our national organisations kind of made me cringe; talking about how the over 30s should look like this or that and not be allowed to walk around like those in their school girl clothes or the 20 somethings in their crazy bubbles of fashion, [I’m paraphrasing but you get the picture]. But where are those representing the younger visually impaired women? And what if, at 30 something you don’t want to look like a business woman and actually want to look sexy yet classy? Is there a place for visually impaired people to get ideas about styles and fashion without having access to fashion magazines or are many put into clothes chosen by others?

 

 

I’m pretty strong minded and know what I like and don’t like. Maybe being able to see as a child has helped me in that area as I can remember colours and patterns. but how do others handle every day fashion or is how you look not of a great importance to you? I know guys will have similar issues but for young ladies with no sight, I’m interested on your thoughts. I know I love clothes, shoes, hair and style, [not huge on make-up but have worn it a lot in the past], an overall stylist freak, since I’ve lost weight again hee. But seriously, we need to remember there are younger visually impaired girlies who want to look and feel good. We don’t want to all dress like our grandmothers, right?

 

Marie

I am 29 and feel like I have more blogs than I care to think about. That's where Life without sight has come into it. I finally have grown up and stepped into the hosting world. Lets see how this goes :)

This Post Has One Comment

  1. this is one of the things I find most frustrating about being a totally blind young woman. now granted, even most sighted peoples’ shopping trips include getting together with the girlies and hittin’ the mall, so it’s not like people really browse by themselves, but what if I wanted too? there’s no way to tell, other than feel, what something looks like. my clothes shopping trips are usually with friends or my mom…lol…but I actually trust her judgement. she’s very fashion conscious and people have told me I always have good clothes so she must do something right. and I trust her and my friends, but it’s frustrating for me not feeling like I get to express myself in my own style. I still get the final say in everything and if I don’t like it I’m not forced to buy it, but I’m definitely frustrated. what if one day I were to wake up and be able to see and look at my clothes and go ewww, even if the rest of the world thinks they’re great? I definitely feel you on this frustration. and I think people with even a little bit of vision don’t have it as bad. my visually impaired friends can still go shopping and pick out stuff even if they have to ask a sales person for clarification on exactly what colour something is at least they know what they like and know mostly what they’re looking at. my favourite t-shirts are the ones with cute sayings on them cuz they give me something to identify with. they’re about more than just colour and sometimes feel which can be misleading.

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